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6 Ways your Soul Seat purchase is a subversive act

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1. You can purchase the Soul Seat over time without interest, reinstating the trust economy. 2. The design will not change at the pace of fashion, but at the pace of human evolution. Your Soul Seat won't go out of style in your lifetime, because it doesn't play that game at all. The Soul Seat was designed by a Yogi piano tuner who appreciates the value of tools that last and remain relavent for hundreds of years. 3. It's construction is durable enough that it can be refurbished multiple times or handed off to someone else if you ever outgrow it by transitioning to sitting mostly on the floor. Recently, a Soul Seat was resold on Craiglist for this very reason. The customer started with the standard Soul Seat, then got flexible enough to remove the Perch completely, (She was the first customer to request a pillow to cover the flange). Then she built her own floor desk to move her work completely to the floor. Her Soul Seat sold for over half of it's retail price after five years of productive use. 4. The Soul Seat represents a range of products that operate outside the current consumerist, rentier economy. It's a product that upgrades you, rather than you needing to fork over more and more rent just to keep it up to date and functioning. It will continue to play well with your body and other valuable creative tools without demanding upgrades.  5. You are supporting a post-industrial, post corporate production and design eco-system. Health By Design is a family owned, community embedded enterprise with a transparent value proposition. 6.  No user contracts! Our business model isn't built on hoovering up your personal data such as Facebook. The Soul Seat  facilitates active sitting, but we don't need to track your movement. We're pretty confident that you'll be making healthy choices as a by product of the greater satisfaction you feel at the end of a busy day.  We trust your word of mouth network will share the value. Your social network won't be healthy if we seek to manipulate...
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Forced to Choose Between Weird Sleep Solutions.

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    My lungs felt like they were going to burst as I clawed my way toward the light above. The urge to breath was overwhelming, but until I broke the surface I knew it would be certain death. Why wasn't the light getting any closer?  Just as I resigned myself to this watery death, mercifully, I woke up. I was gasping and drenched in sweat as I was released from this nightmare for the second time in a month.  Looking around with gratitude at being alive, my wife Rebecca sleeping soundly beside me, I noticed that the clerestory windows above our bed set the depth of my drowning. I started connecting the dots to my dry throat in the morning, snoring awake in meditation as my soft palate collapsed, the daily grogginess.  I had heard from friends about the solutions they had found, from tape on the nose to dental devices to CPAC machines they lugged on trips to hum beside them on the hotel nightstand.  Having thoroughly worked myself into a waking nightmare, I was determined to delay this future, but how?   How can a hard palette be the answer to a soft one? I remember my first snork, lying in corpse pose at the end of a yoga class years ago.  This was a class I was teaching so I wasn’t even dropping into deep meditation when suddenly a loud snork jolted me out of the zone.  It was me.  My soft palate had collapsed, stopping my slow breath.  “Welcome to middle age,” I thought.  Around the same time I had noticed, I could fully relax while face down on a massage table, no snork.  What if I could train myself to sleep on my stomach?  Babies do it, toddlers do it.     My first few efforts were not successful. I merely started the night’s sleep on my stomach. Thank goodness I was exhausted enough to actually fall asleep before my arms followed suit.  If I wasn’t woken up by numb hands and arms,  I would wake up on my side or back.  My pillow...
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History of the Slouch

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Our latest Infographic.  Layout: Sarah Redohl Storylab.com
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Is the Customer always right?

As a piano tuner, I occasionally have to pronounce a customer's piano dead, ready for the landfill.  This happened last month, when I was asked to come tune an otherwise fine looking spinet piano.  Spinet's are the bane of the piano technician.  At under four feet tall, the length of their strings are too short, and soundboards too small to create the sound you expect from a piano.  With the keys too short and the action shrunk and crammed in too small a space, normal repairs are equivalent to removing a car's engine to change the spark plugs.  Thank goodness they haven't been produced for decades.  As the last surviving ones reach the end of their lives, they can pass through a number of hands causing all sorts of disappointment and expense.  The customer always feels duped, because these pianos look all right, their keys may all be in place, the case may have been cared for and is a good piece of furniture.  Folks sooner or later find out how little theirs is worth compared to the cost of moving or rebuilding it.  Then they place it back on Craig's List for free for someone else to take off their hands.  The next unsuspecting owner thinks they've got a deal, until the piano tuner comes and informs them of the cost to make it functional.  The cycle repeats. The poor spinet can't please anyone.  Its quality as a musical instrument is so poor that it doesn't flatter anyone who tries to play it, it doesn't satisfy the piano tuner since it rarely sounds appreciably better once tuned.  Because of the way it's designed,  normally affordable repairs are triple what they would be on any other piano.   Why,  you wonder, would such a pile of compromises ever be produced? We the customers brought this on ourselves in collusion with piano makers.  This sad state of affairs began in the 1950's when the piano industry was too accommodating to what customers said they wanted.  Piano owners had complained for decades about the size and weight of pianos.  We customers complained about...
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