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How often does your skeleton come in for a landing?

floorview I find myself tracing the “flight paths” of people’s skeletons. I know, it’s odd.  I tend to notice the corridor where our pelvi move through space most of the time, and I reckon we inhabit a narrow vertical range of between 17 and 35 inches with small variations due to our height.  We who spend a lot of time in chairs and cars, and sleep on mattresses with box springs rarely come to a full landing on the ground.  We’re lucky if we have young ones who call us to the floor for an hour of Lego therapy, coloring book group, or a board game retreat. How many grandparents do you know who think they are no longer able to join their grandkids on the floor? If we’re not mindful of this default path, we can become locked into this narrow range. My mother certainly is. She traveled through her 60’s, 70’s and now her 80’s in a very different way than her ancestors, or her peers in other parts of the world. Her pelvis now can never drop below the 18 inch altitude safely. This status also comes with the ignoble label of “Fall Risk”.  Living on stilts during our last decades is not inevitable for human beings, but we’ve created a way of life that incrementally, through thousands of seemingly inconsequential choices, can deliver us permanently to a flight range of fewer choices, less independence. I was contemplating these things recently as my daughter Hannah and I drove to Kansas City to catch a flight. We were on our way to join family for my father-in-law’s memorial service in Florida, I thought about our daily glide paths, how the range of this up and down path of our skeletons can have outsized effects on end of life choices.  For most of our travel, Hannah and my pelvises were traveling at the same altitude as everyone else's, zipping along I-70  then walking to our gate.  Once through security though, our hips followed a slightly different trajectory than those around us.  We found a spot on the floor wtih a...
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Floor Culture and healthy sleeping make a hospital debut.

image5 01 resized 246x300  Floor Culture pioneer,Kyle Salter The first thing you notice about Kyle Salter (after his height) is how impeccably dressed he is, always a suit, tie and tasty kerchief masterly folded into the pocket of his tailored suits.  His easy smile and genuine curiosity completes the picture,  then you notice he's sporting a man-bun.  Kyle is one of those folks whose confidence and poise let him pull off just about anything he chooses.  This came in handy recently when he became one of our latest ambassadors for floor culture at the Santa Monica Hospital. The greatest satisfaction from building and promoting the Soul Seat is seeing the change in people's lives as they incorporate the tools we've developed.  Kyle Salter's recent experience demonstrates that the benefits to be had from the Soul Seat lifestyle can be realized well before ever owning one.  I had the pleasure of meeting Kyle on a recent trip to LA while helping my daughter Zoe get through a tonsillectomy.  He and Zoe began dating earlier this year, and he took time off from work to join me in the surgery's waiting room.   After confirming our mutual Zoe fan club status, we got to talking about my floor sleeping regimen for the past two years. I have a number of tall friends who swear the only way they can get a good night's sleep is to lie on their stomach.  Kyle confirmed that this was true for him as well.  He was intrigued that I've rehabbed my tight psoas muscles by sleeping primarily on the floor.  Later on, I showed him a few of the postures I use, explained how I gradually transitioned to less and less padding as my flexibility and comfort increased. Within a couple of days, Kyle had transferred his sleeping to the floor, sending out photos of his pallet beside his conventional bed.  In fact, so thoroughly had he embraced the benefits of this new approach to sleeping, he wasn't willing to backtrack even for one night in a hospital. During Zoe's second week of recovery she had to spend the night...
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BLT Stands for Belly Sleep, Lotus Pose and Throughput

Since developing the Soul Seat, I've discovered two keystone behaviors glued together with a concept that have a profound and lasting effect on flexibility, productivity, focus, and general health.  They are "keystone" in the sense that the more you practice them, the more able you are to realize their benefits with less effort.  They are their own virtuous circles whose positive results ripple out into the rest of your daily activities.  When combined with the concept of Throughput, its a self-reinforcing positive loop. B is for Belly Sleep,  maximizing the amount of time you sleep on your stomach.  L is for Lotus pose, either half or full, and T is for Throughput. (I hope to post in the future specifically about throughput).  Throughput is the more esoteric of the three, but it is key to measuring your progress towards more and more of B and L, as well as helping you to perceive the positive effects of the B and L in various facets of your life.  I use throughput to keep me focused on my progress in mastering Lotus and Belly Sleep and then again to measure how these two key behaviors impact the rest of my goals and aspirations.  Throughput is a way to amplify the often incremental and subtle progress in any health regimen to keep motivation in place. Belly Sleep I know that sleeping on your stomach is controversial.  Any Google search on the topic will produce plenty of opinions in both directions, pro and con.  From SIDS to neck problems, sleeping on your belly is thought to be contraindicated.  Some people swear by it and even suggest that babies sleep better on their stomachs.  I'm not qualified to wade into the SIDS controversy.   I want to talk here about choices we have a grown people. I first started experimenting with sleeping on my stomach a couple of years ago as I was working toward my goal of mastering the Lotus pose by my 50th birthday.  My routine was to focus my stretching before bed on Lotus and then again first thing in the morning.  I found...
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What's behind the Soul Seat price?

We occasionally get comments and questions about the price of the Soul Seat from folks who haven't had a chance to see one in person.  $698 for the basic model surprises some folks when they encounter us only on the web.  This is completely understandable since its conventional looking task chair legs bring to mind a $39 Office Depot special.  However, that's where the comparison ends.  Folks who've had a chance to sit on a Soul Seat rarely voice this price concern.  We're more likely to hear a variation on "Darn, if I only had the money today..." Why is that?  If you attempted to achieve the full range of productivity, health maintenance and posture options that the Soul Seat brings to the workplace on either a $39 discount chair or a $1200 Aeron with all the bells and whistles, you would be equally disappointed.  The Soul Seat occupies a different paradigm.  The design is informed by how a healthy body settles on the ground.  It affords you all the posture choices that evolved with us over thousands of years of sitting without chairs.  Once you've regained your childhood flexibility, your best choice is to work on the floor with a mass-produced lap-desk from Wall-Mart at $19.  If you're conscious about your decor, you can find custom floor desks on our Etsy site.  But if you want these sitting options and benefits at the desk-top level, make the Soul Seat your choice. When compared to high-end ergonomic chairs intended to maximize the health, comfort and productivity of the modern knowledge worker, (ranging from $800-$1400) the price of the Soul Seat appears to be a good bargain.  However, even that's a false comparison.  So what should the Soul Seat be compared to?  The Soul Seat's competition for your loyalty doesn't reside in a task chair, or even a ball chair.  The Soul Seats' only real competition, as mentioned above,  is the floor.  And to that we're happy to concede defeat.  We would much rather see you working on the floor and utilize the need to file papers, receive visitors, or fill your...
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